Wine Education: Japanese Saké

Wine Education: Japanese Saké

WINE EDUCATION: Japanese Saké  If all you know about Sake is the warm, alcoholic, rustic stuff served at many hibachi grills and Japanese restaurants, then you will be amazed by the range of flavors and the complexity of cold sakes. MEET SAKE: Sake’ boasts flavors of berries, melons, anise, lychee, macadamia, peaches, white pepper and a myriad of other tastes can all be found in small batch, artisan made cold-serve Sakes.  These Sake’s are not just for pairing with sushi either, they are great food wines that match up well with any cuisine you would normally serve a Sauvignon Blanc or Chablis with. Sake is a gluten free, sulfite free beverage perfect for many who suffer with headaches, rashes and other allergies associate with many other alcoholic drinks. Often called “rice wine” Sake is actually a brewed product, more similar to beer than to wine. Rice, water, yeast and a special mold affected rice(Koji) are the only ingredients in many premium Sakes (alcohol spirits are added to some to help bring out more flavor), and each of those three components will have a profound effect on the finished product. Here are some popular sake terms: DAIGINJO: 50% or more of kernel polished away. GINJO: 40% or more of kernel polished away. HONJOZO: 30% or more of kernel polished away. FUTSU: “Table Sake” with no minimum polishing requirements. Accounts for 75% of total Sake production JUNMAI: Sake made without the addition of distilled alcohol, or “pure rice saké”. GENSHU: A Saké that is undiluted before bottling. POLISHING GRADES: Rice kernels for making sake are “polished” to remove the proteins, minerals and other impurities located in the outer portion...

Riedel Seminar

RIEDEL STEMWARE SEMINAR Tuesday, September 20th, 6:30pm Seating limited to 18 $55 per person (Take Home $60 worth of glassware) BUY TICKETS Ever wonder why some people make such a big deal about their wine glasses? Here’s your chance to see for yourself how big of a difference the wine glass can make in your taste and perception of the wine. Glassware and crystal makers since the mid-1700’s, the Riedel Stemware Company was the first one to demonstrate the size and shape of a wine glass can greatly alter how the wine tastes and is perceived. In the 1950’s Claus Riedel (pronounced like needle but with an “r”) introduced the first wineglasses designed specifically for certain wine varietals. Over the decades since, Riedel has introduced a number of “Varietal Specific” wine glasses and proven to just about everyone that the proper glass can enhance the enjoyment of your wine. We’ll be tasting 5 wines from their proper Riedel glass against the same wine from a non-Riedel “joker” glass and we’ll begin the night with a little sparkling wine. At the end of the night we guarantee that you’ll be amazed how much the glass influences the way your wines tastes AND you’ll get to take your 5 glasses home with you – 1 Sparkling, 1 Chardonnay, 1 Sauvignon Blanc, 1 Cabernet, & 1 Pinot Noir...